Cajun Country

    Ever since the opening of the 1984 Worlds Fair, people around the world have been confusing New Orleans with Cajun country. It isn't so. Although there are a lot of Cajuns living in New Orleans, Cajun country begins approximately 50 miles west of the city.

 

     Known locally as Acadiana, Cajun country extends along LA Highway 90 from the Houma/ Thibodaux area west to Jennings. South of New Orleans, the Cajun country stretches from Grand Isle, westward to Holly Beach in Cameron Parish.

 

      The word "Cajun" is a derivative of Acadian, and our people are descendants of French settlers in Nova Scotia. The Cajuns  were uprooted by the English during the Seven Year War in 1750. For 35 years, the Acadians wandered, searching for a new homeland. They finally settled in southwest Louisiana around  1775. Today you will find people who still speak their native French, have a strong accent when speaking English and an even stronger faith in traditional food, dance, joie de vie and the Catholic Church. 

 

      There have been a number of films made in Cajun country and the cities most used as base camp when filming are Lafayette, Thibodaux and Morgan City. Twenty miles in any direction of these small towns you will find oak covered bayous, plantations with rice, soy bean and sugar cane fields, as well as farmland, prairies and swamplands. Should you need a trappers cabin, a Creole Cottage or a plantation for your next location, give me a call.

Louisiana Film Locations, Cajuns, Swamp, Film Louisiana, New Orleans Locations, Film Commission, Jazz,Plantations

Islands of the Marsh Productions / T 504.453.2451 / islmarsh@bellsouth.net / © 2013 by Islands of the Marsh Productions

Gerard Sellers Cajun Country